Connected Courses

Students in Greenhouse are required to enroll in a connected course each semester. Students will enroll is one 2 credit hour course in the fall and one 1 credit hour course in the spring semester. These two courses will fulfil one 3 credit hour UK Core requirement for U.S. Citizenship/Diversity/Community.

Spring 2016 Courses

Class  (1 credit)

Title  

Day   

Time 

Instructor     

Location

UK 100-001 

The Sustainability Challenge

Wednesday 

5:00-6:00

Carmen Agouridis

The 90

UK 100-002

A World of Rivers             

Tuesday

4:00-4:50

Alan Fryar             

The 90

UK 100-003 

Real World Sustainability  

Tuesday

5:00-6:00

Mary Arthur     

The 90

Descriptions:

Real World Rivers: Rivers make up only a tiny fraction of all the water on Earth, yet they are profoundly important. They sculpt the landscape and provide critical habitats. River valleys were the “cradle of civilization” in Africa and Asia, and rivers remain essential for water supply, transport, and other human uses. With the Kentucky River as our focus, we will explore the multiple roles of rivers and how humans interact with them. Activities will include readings, movie viewings, local field trips, reflective writing, and group discussions.

Real-world Sustainablity Achieving environmental sustainability will require our creativity and active involvement, not just our understanding.   This one-credit course will provide you with the opportunity to learn how others have developed new ideas in the service of sustainability, and how they are implementing those ideas through the development of various types of organizations. The focus of this course will be learning about specific organizations, on campus and in Lexington, that in some way address a goal pertaining to environmental sustainability.  We will learn more about the individual organizations, but also about how such organizations are formed, where the kernel of the idea comes from, how they are sustained financially and through volunteers, and how they define and measure their own success in accomplishing their objectives. During the middle 8 weeks of the semester (February 9-April 5), each student will conduct a brief internship with one organization, spending 3 hours per week; there will not be any other homework required for this course, and there will be internship sites both on and off campus.

 

Fall 2015 Courses

Connected Course: Pathways and Barriers to Environmental Sustainability: The course will introduce the principles of environmental sustainability in the context of the campus, local and global communities. The course will consist of four modules: (1) Urban Food and Forests, (2) Barriers to Sustainability, (3) Water Quality and Quantity, and (4) Ecosystem Protection and Restoration. Topics will include food deserts and local food production, the role of urban forests in providing ecosystem services, energy production and use, consumerism, transportation, water sources and uses, storm water, trash, deforestation, and methods for protection and restoring ecosystems.

Fall Course Schedule (Choose one)

UK 100-001         Monday & Wednesday                 2:00-2:50 pm     

UK 100-002         Monday & Wednesday                 4:00-4:50 pm

UK 100-003         Monday & Wednesday                 3:00-3:50 pm

* Each class is team taught by all four faculty directors, Dr. Mary Arthur, Dr. Carmen Agouridis, Dr. Alan Fryar, and Dr. Shannon Bell and is taught at The 90.

 

Spring 2015 semester: 1 credit hour

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Location

Note

A&S 100-011

A World of Rivers

Alan Fryar

Tuesday

4:00 PM – 4:50 PM

Classroom 1

 

A&S 100-012

Energy and Society

Shannon Bell

Monday

4:00 PM – 5:40 PM

Classroom 1

Class meets from January 26th until March 23rd.

A&S 100-013

Real World Sustainability: Stepping into the Community

Mary Arthur

Tuesday

5:00 PM – 5:50 PM

Classroom 1

February 9th- April 10th, three hours a week in a mini- internship

A&S 100-014

The Sustainability Challenge

Carmen Agouridis

Wednesday

5:00 PM – 5:50 PM

Classroom 1

 

 

  • Students will be required to select a one-credit hour seminar
  • Classes are held in the residence hall, Woodland Glen II classrooms
  • Choose a topic taught by one of the Faculty Directors.
  • There will be guest speakers, more field trips and a community project.

A World of Rivers (A&S 100-011, Tuesday, 4:00 PM - 4:50 PM) Alan Fryar, Earth and Environmental Sciences

Rivers make up only a tiny fraction of all the water on Earth, yet they are profoundly important. They sculpt the landscape and provide critical habitats. River valleys were the “cradle of civilization” in Africa and Asia, and rivers remain essential for water supply, transport, and other human uses. Using Ellen Wohl’s book “A World of Rivers” as a foundation, we will explore the multiple roles of rivers and how humans interact with them. Activities will include readings, movie viewings, a canoe trip on the Kentucky River, reflective writing, and group discussions.

Energy and Society (A&S 100-012, Monday, 4:00 PM - 5:40 PM *Class meets from January 26th until March 23rd.Shannon Bell, Sociology

In this course we will examine energy production through a social science lens. Topics covered include climate change; the extraction and burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas); nuclear energy; renewable energy sources (wind, solar, hydroelectricity, biomass, geothermal); challenges to transportation sustainability; and the politics and power dynamics limiting social change around energy production and use. Significant attention will be given to the solutions social scientists propose for addressing the climate crisis we currently face.

Real World Sustainability: Stepping into the Community (A&S 100-013, Tuesday, 5:00 PM - 5:50 PM *February 9th- April 10th, three hours a week in a mini-internship) Mary Arthur, Forestry

Achieving environmental sustainability will require our creativity and active involvement, not just our understanding.   This one-credit course will provide you with the opportunity to learn how others have developed new ideas in the service of sustainability, and how they are implementing those ideas through the development of various types of organizations. The focus of this course will be learning about specific organizations, on campus and in Lexington, that in some way address a goal pertaining to environmental sustainability.  We will learn more about the individual organizations, but also about how such organizations are formed, where the kernel of the idea comes from, how they are sustained financially and through volunteers, and how they define and measure their own success in accomplishing their objectives. During the middle 8 weeks of the semester (February 9-April 10), each student will conduct a brief mini-internship with one organization, spending an average of 3 hours per week; other than weekly written reflections, there will not be any other homework required for this course. We will structure the course in such a way to support and enhance the students’ understanding of how organizations function in achieving their objectives.

The Sustainability Challenge (A&S 100-014, Wednesday, 5:00 PM - 5:50 PM) Carmen Agouridis, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

This course examines the challenges and benefits associated with living a more sustainable lifestyle. Students gain first-hand knowledge by making a personal change in their lives and developing a plan of action to positively influence others. Typical course activities include blogging, guest speakers, and field trips.

 

Fall 2014 Course Schedule: 2 credit hours

Class Days Time Location
A&S 100-002 MW 2:00-2:50 pm Classroom 1, Woodland Glen II
A&S 100-003 MW 3:00-3:50 pm Classroom 1, Woodland Glen II
A&S 100-004 MW 2:00-2:50 pm Classroom 2, Woodland Glen II
A&S 100-005 MW 3:00-3:50 pm Classroom 2, Woodland Glen II

Course Description

The course will introduce the principles of environmental sustainability in the context of the campus, local and global communities. The course will consist of four modules: (1) Urban Food and Forests, (2) Barriers to Sustainability, (3) Water Quantity and Quality, and (4) Ecosystem Protection and Restoration. Topics will include food deserts and  local food production, the role of urban forests in providing ecosystem services, energy production and use, consumerism, transportation, water sources and uses, stormwater, trash, deforestation, and methods for protection and restoring ecosystems. (2 credit hours)

  • Classes are held in the residence hall, Woodland Glen II classrooms.
  • All four Faculty Directors will teach the course.
  • Class discussions, readings, videos, guest speakers and field trips

 

Topics include:

  • What is sustainability, ecosystems, stormwater and deforestation?
  • Where does water come from and where does it go after we use it?
  • Whose trash is it anyway?
  • Food production, food deserts, local production and access and forest cover
  • Energy, environment, society and environmental justice
  • Living beside chemical/plastics plants, socially responsible clothing choices
  • Gas Guzzlers to Hybrids
  • What’s going on in Lexington?
  • How is UK responding?

 

What are the requirements for program participation beyond the connected classes?

Greenhouse offers a number of extracurricular activities that foster strong relationships between students in the program and between students and the faculty. Students are required to attend six co-curricular events offered by the program each semester. At least one event must be an off–campus field trip sponsored by the program.

Students will have a variety of offerings to choose from such as weekly chats, dinner and discussion groups, field trips, walking tours and various other programs offered by the faculty and peer mentors.

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